Rome Faculty

Professor Richard Bonanno, Program Director 2013-2014

Richard Bonanno is Associate Professor of Italian and the Italian Studies program in the Department of Modern and Classical Languages and Cultures at Assumption College, which offers both a major and minor in Italian Studies. He holds a PhD in Italian from Rutgers University, where taught Italian and served as fellow in Rutgers University's Summer Study in Urbino. He has also participated as instructor of Italian in the Mediterranean Studies Association's 2011 summer program in Nocciano and Messina.

Professor Bonanno is affiliated with a number of professional organizations and has published essays on topics such as Renaissance lyric poetry and Italian-American folklore. He maintains an active research agenda through participation in national and international conferences, delivering scholarly papers on topics including early modern Italian literature, foreign language pedagogy, and Italian-American folklore and culture.

Professor Daria Borghese

Professor Borghese has taught in Italy and in the U.S.A. courses that range from Italian Renaissance to Baroque Art. Her research focuses on the role of patrons in art; her latest publications include studies on the Casina di Pio IV in the Vatican, Palazzo Colonna and Palazzo Borromeo, all landmarks of artistic patronage in Rome. She is also involved with designing and editing an advanced, interactive textbook on Art in Rome. Professor Borghese’s continuing exploration of the city nourishes her research and her teaching, that is conducted mostly on-site to give students the opportunity to experience and discover world famous masterpieces. She is also often interviewed for programs and documentaries about art in Rome. She holds a B.A. in Literature and Philosophy and M.A. in History of Medioeval and Modern Art from the University of Rome La Sapienza.

Professor A.J. Boyd

Andrew ‘A. J.’ Boyd, originally from the Seattle area, has lived in Rome since 2009, when he was granted a Russell Berrie Fellowship in Interreligious Studies at the Pontifical University of St. Thomas Aquinas (the Angelicum). Currently working on a doctorate of sacred theology in ecumenism and dialogue, A. J. teaches theology at Assumption College and ecumenism and interreligious dialogue for seminarians at the Pontifical Beda College. He serves as graduate assistant at the John Paul II Center for Interreligious Dialogue, and lives and works with The Catholic University of America Rome program. He is a recent alumnus of the Lay Centre at Foyer Unitas.

Before moving to Rome, he spent seven years in pastoral ministry for the Archdiocese of Seattle. His previous studies included philosophy, theology, and pastoral leadership at the University of Notre Dame, The Catholic University of America, and Seattle University. His area of research includes ecclesiological issues in ecumenism, and is particularly interested in the diaconate and other less well-understood forms of ministry.

Professor Joseph Foley

Joseph T. Foley co-founded the business studies program at Assumption and is the long-time chair. The business program offers majors in accounting, management, marketing, international business and organizational communication as well as five related minors. He also directed the MBA program for three terms. His undergraduate courses include Small Business and Entrepreneurship, Personal Financial Management, Principles of Accounting and Intermediate Accounting.

Professor Foley's scholarship focuses on personal finance, accounting theory and international financial reporting standards. He holds a bachelor's degree in political science from the College of the Holy Cross, an MS and an MBA from the Northeastern Graduate School of Professional Accounting and is a Certified Public Accountant.

Professor Mary Foley

Mary Foley is a lecturer in the Assumption College Department of Human Services and Rehabilitation Studies. She holds a bachelor's degree and an MA in Special Education from Assumption, and has extensive experience as a special education teacher.

Professor Foley was the lead special education teacher for eleven years at the Mercy Centre for Developmental Disabilities in Worcester. For the past two years, she has been a special education mathematics teacher and the special education natural science liaison at Assabet Valley Regional Technical High School in Marlborough, MA. She regularly teaches the Introduction to Human Services and Rehabilitation Studies course at Assumption.

Professor Elisabeth Howe

Elisabeth Howe is an Emerita Professor from the Department of Modern and Classical Languages and Cultures at Assumption College, where she taught French and Comparative Literature for 22 years. She holds a BA in French from University College, London; a degree in Russian from the Université de Grenoble, France; and a PhD in French from Harvard University.

Professor Howe has published three books, two on French or English poetry and one, entitled Close Reading, a textbook for Introduction to Literature classes. She has made many conference presentations and published articles on French poetry and on the pedagogy of teaching culture.

Professor Louise Carroll-Keeley

Louise Carroll Keeley is a Professor of Philosophy and, since 2009, Associate Provost at Assumption College.  She holds a bachelor’s degree from Marquette University, and an M.A. and Ph.D. in Philosophy from Boston College. Professor Keeley’s scholarship focuses on the thought of the 19th century Danish philosopher Kierkegaard, especially his religious authorship. Many of her articles are published in various volumes of the International Kierkegaard Commentary.

Professor Lance Lazar

Associate Professor of History and Director of the Medieval and Early Modern Studies Program at Assumption College, Professor Lazar will serve as the Assumption Rome Campus Director during the 2014-2015 Academic Year. Professor Lazar earned his Bachelor’s Degree in Philosophy and History, Summa cum laude, from Dartmouth College and his Ph.D. in History from Harvard University. Professor Lazar is a cultural and social historian of European Civilization from the fourteenth through the eighteenth centuries, especially the Mediterranean world, and Renaissance and Baroque Italy. His book on Italian popular devotion, Working in the Vineyard of the Lord: Jesuit Confraternities in Early Modern Italy (Toronto, 2005) won the American Catholic Historical Association annual Howard R. Marraro Prize. Favorite interests include exploring human creativity in all its forms, but especially the arts, architecture, literature, religion, and charity. Professor Lazar has directed two Foundations Travel Seminars, to Venice in 2010 and to the Low Countries in 2013.

Professor Susan Dawson Vásquez

Susan Dawson Vásquez has been living in Rome for the past 15 years. She has a license in philosophy from the Pontifical Gregorian University and has been teaching for various American universities as well as the Pontifical Beda College. Her main area of philosophical interest is language, how it shapes our shared reality, which is an excellent touchstone for the Ethics course she teaches for Assumption College's Rome Program.