Rome Campus Courses

A variety of liberal arts and pre-professional courses are offered each semester. Course offerings may include History, Art History, Theology, Philosophy, Comparative Literature, Italian, Accounting, Human Services and Rehabilitation Studies, among others. Most courses count towards general education requirements, so students can maintain progress toward their degree while getting the most advantage from study in Rome.  Students of affiliated institutions travel to Rome knowing that they will receive full credit for all courses taken at the Rome campus.  For students from other American colleges and universities, Assumption staff will make every effort to ensure that they too receive full credit for courses taken in Rome. (Please scroll down on this page for detailed course descriptions.)

Spring '16 Fall '16 Spring '17
CLT 266 Italian Cinema ARH 350 Art of Rome (D. Borghese) ARH 223 Renaissance Art and Architecture (D. Borghese)
PHI204R: God and the Philosophers THE 204 Catholicism Today (TBA) THE203 Early Church (TBA)
ARH 224R: Baroque Art and Architecture CLT 206 Literary Foundations of the West II: Romanticism (P. Ady) PHI 202 Ethics (C. Gobel)
THE 204 Catholicism Today PHI 204 God and the Philosophers (C. Gobel) POL203 Modern States (J. Geddert)
ITA101+ Italian at placement level (Italiaidea) ITA 101 (Beginner) to ITA 103 (Advanced)  ITA101+ Italian at placement level (Italiaidea)

Please scroll down to view details of courses offered in Rome.

Spring 2016

CLT 266 Italian Cinema – Rome Campus Faculty
The course provides an introduction to Italian cinema. Students will explore the nature of neorealism, the hallmark of the Italian cinematic tradition, through an examination of the development of the film industry, the socio-historical situation, and the literary tradition within the Italian peninsula. The study of neorealism, which involves discussion of directed readings and screenings of classics by Rossellini, De Sica, and Visconti, provides a basis for the examination of ensuing movements and Italian “auteurs,” such as Fellini, Antonioni, Bertolucci, and Pasolini, and of the contemporary scene. Counts as a second literature (humanities).

PHI204R: God and the Philosophers. Prof. Christian Göbel
Is there a god? The course offers – through the study of some important texts by both believers and non-believers – an examination of the ways that philosophers have understood the divine. After reflecting on the appropriate way to speak of the divine and the relationship between faith and reason, we’ll be discussing some major arguments for and against the existence of God. In a concluding part of the course, special emphasis will be given to the question of the ‘logic’ of the Christian faith, philosophical foundations for interreligious dialogue and the relationship between religion and morality (How does our understanding of the existence and character of the divine bear on our self-understanding and how we live?). Counts in the core as a second or third (humanities) philosophy.

The course takes a systematic approach but we will also focus on two important figures, Augustine and Thomas Aquinas, and ‘follow in their footsteps’ in and outside Rome, e.g. at Santa Sabina, Ostia Antica, Monte Cassino, Aquino, Fossanova, etc.

ARH 224R: Baroque Art and Architecture - Prof. Heidi Gearhart
This course will look at Baroque art and architecture in Italy and, particularly in Rome, from the late sixteenth century to the late seventeenth century. By looking at paintings, sculpture, and architecture, we will be able to study how historical and cultural shifts– such as the Counter Reformation or the growth of scientific thought- affected the way in which art was produced. The course will included multiple on-site visits, helping students understand the experiential and mulit-media aspect of the Baroque. Artists will include Bernini, Caravaggio, and the Carracci. Counts in the core as Art/Mus/Tha and for credit towards Italian Studies major and minor, and the MEMS minor; Museum based.

THE 204 Catholicism Today – Prof. Christian Göbel
Catholics do not live their lives within a Catholic bubble, a hermetically sealed world in which everyone and everything is shaped by the teachings of Catholicism. Christ himself said this would not be the case, informing his disciples that in this world they would have to render to Caesar the things that are Caesar’s and to God that things that are God’s. As a result, the Catholic Church has always had to find some way of engaging the world in which it currently finds itself. This course introduces students to Catholicism’s ongoing engagement with the world today, paying particular attention to both the main currents in contemporary thought and the representative social movements that shape the modern world. Counts in the core as second or third (humanities) theology.

Italian: ITA 101 (Beginner) to ITA 103 (Advanced) - Rome Campus Faculty
Students will study Italian according to skill level. An intensive Italian language study option is also available. Counts in the core at level III or higher. If II is followed by III, both will count If 101 is taken in Rome, and if placement on return is 103, 101 and 103 will count.
 
Independent Study
Students work on independent research projects in an area of their interest, as approved by faculty
 

Fall 2016

ARH 350 Art of Rome (D. Borghese)
 
Counts in the core as Art/Mus/Tha and for credit towards Italian Studies major and minor, and the MEMS minor; museum based
 
THE 204 Catholicism Today (TBA)
Catholics do not live their lives within a Catholic bubble, a hermetically sealed world in which everyone and everything is shaped by the teachings of Catholicism. Christ himself said this would not be the case, informing his disciples that in this world they would have to render to Caesar the things that are Caesar’s and to God that things that are God’s. As a result, the Catholic Church has always had to find some way of engaging the world in which it currently finds itself. This course introduces students to Catholicism’s ongoing engagement with the world today, paying particular attention to both the main currents in contemporary thought and the representative social movements that shape the modern world. This course counts as a second Theology in the Core Curriculum. Prerequisite: THE 100. Counts in the core as second or third (humanities) theology.
 
CLT 206 Literary Foundations of the West II: Romanticism (P. Ady)
This course continues the investigation begun in CLT 205 Literary Foundations of the West I, particularly in the light of the modern insistence on the pre-eminence of the individual person rather than on the community. This course satisfies the Humanities requirement in the Core curriculum. Counts in the core as a second literature (humanities depth)
 
PHI 204 God and the Philosophers (C. Gobel)
An examination of the ways that philosophers have understood the divine. Topics may include arguments for the existence of God, critiques and defenses of classical theism, the appropriate language to speak of the divine, the problem of evil, the nature of religious experience, why miracles may be problematic, science and God. How does one’s understanding of the existence and character of the divine bear on one’s self-understanding and how one lives? Prerequisite: PHI 100. This course fulfills the second philosophy requirement in the Core Curriculum. Counts in the core as a second or third (humanities) philosophy
 
Italian: ITA 101 (Beginner) to ITA 103 (Advanced) - Rome Campus Faculty
Students will study Italian according to skill level. An intensive Italian language study option is also available. Counts in the core at level III or higher. If II is followed by III, both will count If 101 is taken in Rome, and if placement on return is 103, 101 and 103 will count.
 
Italian intensive option or Independent Studies are available as needed.
 

Spring 2017

ARH 223 Renaissance Art and Architecture (D. Borghese)
This course looks at one of the most celebrated eras of art history, the Renaissance. Focusing on Italy and Northern Europe, the course will look at art made from the fourteenth through sixteenth centuries. Major themes will include urban development, economic change, the black plague, and the political and religious forces of culture. Material covered will include painting, sculpture, architecture, and fresco, from the devotional works of the Franciscans to the courtly art made for the Duke of Urbino, and works made for women as well as men. Looking critically at primary source material, such as the writings of Alberti and Vasari, the course will also consider the role of the artist and what is often seen as his rise in status, through examples like Botticelli, Michelangelo, Giotto and Dürer. This course satisfies the Core requirement in Art, Music & Theatre. Counts in the core as Art/Mus/Tha and for credit towards Italian Studies major and minor, and the MEMS minor; Museum based.
 
THE 203 Early Church (TBA)
We examine how the Christians of the first five centuries worked out the implications of their original profession of faith in Jesus Christ. What was the relationship between Christian discipleship and Judaism? How did the early Christians envision their role within their social, cultural, and political surroundings? We look back to the earliest Christian writings in order to see how the Christian Church came into existence and to grapple with issues that continue to be important today: the nature of God and Christ, grace and salvation, the use and interpretation of the Bible, and the practice of faith and the sacraments. This course counts as a second Theology in the Core Curriculum. Prerequisite: THE 100. Counts in the core as second or third (humanities) theology
 
PHI 202 Ethics (C. Gobel)
Ethics is an exploration of the question, “How should I live?” Classical, modern, and contemporary positions, as well as practical examples will be examined in an attempt to understand the best human life. Prerequisite: PHI 100. This course fulfills the second philosophy requirement in the Core Curriculum. Counts in the core as a second or third (humanities) philosophy
 
POL 203 Modern States (J. Geddert)
A comparative analysis of major types of ancient and modern political systems, with an emphasis on the Western European liberal democracies of Great Britain and France and on the 20th century experience of totalitarian despotism. Counts in the core as a social science.
 
Italian: ITA 101 (Beginner) to ITA 103 (Advanced) - Rome Campus Faculty
Students will study Italian according to skill level. An intensive Italian language study option is also available. Counts in the core at level III or higher. If II is followed by III, both will count If 101 is taken in Rome, and if placement on return is 103, 101 and 103 will count.
 
Italian intensive option or Independent Studies are available as needed.
 

The Rome Experience

  • Jenna Warren '14
    Participant Fall 2013

    "By far my favorite part about taking classes in Rome is the out-of-classroom experience. Not only are we learning about the incredible amount of history that Rome has to offer but we're witnessing it firsthand. I have really been able to blossom as a student."

  • Joelle DiDomenico ’14
    Participant Spring 2013

    “I would highly recommend going to the Rome campus. It is an experience of a lifetime. I learned so many things about myself while abroad . I am a completely different person now."

  • Tracy Baldelli ’15
    Participant Spring 2013

    “I would most definitely recommend this to others. One of the main reasons why I chose Assumption was for the community feeling that it offers. This community component flourishes at the Rome Campus because it is such a small unique program that not many universities offer."

  • Jessica Reimers ’14
    Participant Spring 2013

    “The Rome campus wasn't just a study abroad. It was a home where I lived with family. The atmosphere blended the students, the professors, our cook, and the countless others who we saw everyday, because like our extended family, they made our experience ten times better."