September 2014
30 September 2014 - 6:00pm to 8:00pm
Latin American Video-Conference Series: The Centrality of Afro-descendant Communities

Latin American Video-Conference Series: The Centrality of Afro-descendant Communities

30 September 2014 - 6:00pm to 8:00pm
06:00 PM
Type of Event: 
What does our ever-changing globalized world look like from Ecuador which is located at the center of the world?  More specifically, what might our ever-changing globalized world look like from Ecuador's Afro-descendant communities?  Finally, why might these questions be relevant to our own efforts in the United States to make sense of a fragmented and fractured world that grows more and more elusive and confounding each day?  This presentation is an effort to answer the above questions and begin a conversation about the centrality of Ecuador and its Afro-descendant communities.
 
Prof. Handelsman has been named a Lindsay Young Scholar, and was awarded the 2004 Alexander Prize for teaching and scholarship and the 2005 Chancellor’s Excellence in Teaching Award. In 2008, he received the Jefferson Prize in recognition of exceptional contributions to research, teaching, and service. Some of his books are: Amazonas y artistas: un estudio de la prosa de la mujer ecuatoriana (1978), El modernismo en las revistas literarias del Ecuador: 1895-1930 (1981), Incursiones en el mundo literario del Ecuador (1987), En torno al verdadero Benjamín Carrión (1989), El ideario de Benjamín Carrión (1992), Lo afro y la plurinacionalidad: el caso ecuatoriano visto desde su literatura (1999; 2001), Culture and Customs of Ecuador (2000).
 
For more information, contact Juan Carlos Grijalva. Click for printable flyer.
Contact Person: 
Juan Carlos Grijalva
jgrijalv@assumption.edu
General Admission Fee: 
Free

Kennedy Memorial Hall - Room 112

What does our ever-changing globalized world look like from Ecuador which is located at the center of the world?  More specifically, what might our ever-changing globalized world look like from Ecuador's Afro-descendant communities?  Finally, why might these questions be relevant to our own efforts in the United States to make sense of a fragmented and fractured world that grows more and more elusive and confounding each day?  This presentation is an effort to answer the above questions and begin a conversation about the centrality of Ecuador and its Afro-descendant communities.
 
Prof. Handelsman has been named a Lindsay Young Scholar, and was awarded the 2004 Alexander Prize for teaching and scholarship and the 2005 Chancellor’s Excellence in Teaching Award. In 2008, he received the Jefferson Prize in recognition of exceptional contributions to research, teaching, and service. Some of his books are: Amazonas y artistas: un estudio de la prosa de la mujer ecuatoriana (1978), El modernismo en las revistas literarias del Ecuador: 1895-1930 (1981), Incursiones en el mundo literario del Ecuador (1987), En torno al verdadero Benjamín Carrión (1989), El ideario de Benjamín Carrión (1992), Lo afro y la plurinacionalidad: el caso ecuatoriano visto desde su literatura (1999; 2001), Culture and Customs of Ecuador (2000).
 
For more information, contact Juan Carlos Grijalva. Click for printable flyer.
October 2014
1 October 2014 - 7:00pm
President's Lecture Series: The Moral Voice of Pope Francis

President's Lecture Series: The Moral Voice of Pope Francis

1 October 2014 - 7:00pm
7:00 PM
Type of Event: 
Event Venue: 

John L. Allen Jr., D.S.Litt, Associate Editor of The Boston Globe and Senior Vatican Analyst for CNN will deliver the first lecture of the 2014-2015 Assumption College President's Lecture Series. The Series provides a public forum in which important ethical, spiritual and human issues are illuminated and examined within the Catholic intellectual tradition.

Allen is associate editor of The Boston Globe, specializing in coverage of the Vatican and the Catholic Church, and of the Globe’s online magazine Crux. He also serves as senior Vatican analyst for CNN and was for 16 years the prize-winning senior correspondent for the National Catholic Reporter. Allen is the author of seven bestselling books on the Vatican and Catholic affairs and frequently writes on the Church for major national and international publications. His weekly Internet column, “All Things Catholic,” is widely read as a source of insight on the global Church

In his lecture Allen will discuss how he believes the key to understanding Pope Francis is that the Holy Father sees himself as the “Pope of Mercy,” operating in what he has described as a kairos, or privileged moment, to deliver a message of mercy.

All lectures in the series are open to the Assumption College community and the general public at no charge. RSVPs are encouraged due to limited space. Please call Sharon Mahoney at 508-767-7322 or e-mail shmahone@assumption.edu for more information.

Contact Person: 
Sharon Mahoney
508-767-7322
shmahone@assumption.edu

Hagan Campus Center

John L. Allen Jr., D.S.Litt, Associate Editor of The Boston Globe and Senior Vatican Analyst for CNN will deliver the first lecture of the 2014-2015 Assumption College President's Lecture Series. The Series provides a public forum in which important ethical, spiritual and human issues are illuminated and examined within the Catholic intellectual tradition.

Allen is associate editor of The Boston Globe, specializing in coverage of the Vatican and the Catholic Church, and of the Globe’s online magazine Crux. He also serves as senior Vatican analyst for CNN and was for 16 years the prize-winning senior correspondent for the National Catholic Reporter. Allen is the author of seven bestselling books on the Vatican and Catholic affairs and frequently writes on the Church for major national and international publications. His weekly Internet column, “All Things Catholic,” is widely read as a source of insight on the global Church

In his lecture Allen will discuss how he believes the key to understanding Pope Francis is that the Holy Father sees himself as the “Pope of Mercy,” operating in what he has described as a kairos, or privileged moment, to deliver a message of mercy.

All lectures in the series are open to the Assumption College community and the general public at no charge. RSVPs are encouraged due to limited space. Please call Sharon Mahoney at 508-767-7322 or e-mail shmahone@assumption.edu for more information.

7 October 2014 - 6:00pm to 8:00pm
Latin American Video-Conference Series: “We are the Children of the Jaguar”

Latin American Video-Conference Series: “We are the Children of the Jaguar”

7 October 2014 - 6:00pm to 8:00pm
06:00 pm
Type of Event: 
The Latin American Video-Conference Series presents “We are the Children of the Jaguar”:  A Conversation with Indian Filmmaker Eriberto Gualinga. “Children of the Jaguar,” a documentary depicting the daily resistance of the inhabitants of Sarayaku in the Amazon Region of Ecuador, is a testament to a free community that stands firm in its defense of the Amazon forest. Filmmaker Eriberto Gualinga is the director of this documentary and winner of two film festival prizes: the National Geographic's award for best documentary and Columbia's Indigenous Festival prize for best depiction of a struggle by an indigenous people.  For this conversation, attendees will be connected to the Ecuadorian jungle where Eriberto lives.
 
For more information, contact Juan Carlos Grijalva. ​ Click for printable flyer.
 
Contact Person: 
Juan Carlos Grijalva
jgrijalv@assumption.edu
General Admission Fee: 
Free

Kennedy Memorial Hall - Room 112

The Latin American Video-Conference Series presents “We are the Children of the Jaguar”:  A Conversation with Indian Filmmaker Eriberto Gualinga. “Children of the Jaguar,” a documentary depicting the daily resistance of the inhabitants of Sarayaku in the Amazon Region of Ecuador, is a testament to a free community that stands firm in its defense of the Amazon forest. Filmmaker Eriberto Gualinga is the director of this documentary and winner of two film festival prizes: the National Geographic's award for best documentary and Columbia's Indigenous Festival prize for best depiction of a struggle by an indigenous people.  For this conversation, attendees will be connected to the Ecuadorian jungle where Eriberto lives.
 
For more information, contact Juan Carlos Grijalva. ​ Click for printable flyer.
 
7 October 2014 - 6:30pm
AIA Lecture John J. Dobbins Architecture and Mosaics in the House of the Drinking Contest at Antioch: Reconstructing the Ancient Context

AIA Lecture John J. Dobbins Architecture and Mosaics in the House of the Drinking Contest at Antioch: Reconstructing the Ancient Context

7 October 2014 - 6:30pm
6:30 PM
Type of Event: 
Event Venue: 

Antioch-on-the-Orontes was the capital of the Roman province of Syria and one of the most important cities in antiquity.  Among the treasures discovered by the 1930s excavations at Antioch and its vicinity are numerous polychrome floor mosaics.  This presentation focuses on reconstructing the original setting of the mosaics from the third-century CE House of the Drinking Contest at Seleucia Pieria, the port city of Antioch.  Mosaics from the house now are located in Worcester, Boston, Princeton, Richmond, Denver, St. Petersburg (FL), and Antakya (site of Antioch in Turkey). 

The separation of the mosaics has severed them from their original site and from each other.  Not even the original excavators saw the mosaics in their ancient context because the roofs of the house were gone as were the walls that supported the roofs and created windows, doors, and a courtyard that admitted light into the house.  Excavation photographs present the mosaics in place, but the lighting conditions were those of the 1930s.  The ancient occupants saw light enter over walls, through windows, and between columns as it moved across pavements during the course of the day and the arc of the year.  Neither excavation photographs nor museum environments recreate the ancient context.

Computer science addresses the problem of the lost architectural and lighting contexts through a 3D model created by Ethan Gruber that recreates the house and inserts the mosaics into the spaces that originally contained them.  A programming script calibrates the sunlight to the latitude and longitude of Seleucia Pieria and is set to the year 230 thus enabling an accurate lighting simulation for the house and its mosaics.  The computer model presents a graphic rendering of the hypotheses underpinning the architectural reconstruction.  Lighting simulations present the lighting conditions at the summer and winter solstices of the year 230.  Time-lapse videos allow the viewer to observe and study the movement of light throughout the house on those days.  Finally, the model places the viewer within the ancient spaces, thereby reconstructing and recontextualizing view corridors within the house and from the house to the natural environment.


Hagan Hall

Antioch-on-the-Orontes was the capital of the Roman province of Syria and one of the most important cities in antiquity.  Among the treasures discovered by the 1930s excavations at Antioch and its vicinity are numerous polychrome floor mosaics.  This presentation focuses on reconstructing the original setting of the mosaics from the third-century CE House of the Drinking Contest at Seleucia Pieria, the port city of Antioch.  Mosaics from the house now are located in Worcester, Boston, Princeton, Richmond, Denver, St. Petersburg (FL), and Antakya (site of Antioch in Turkey). 

The separation of the mosaics has severed them from their original site and from each other.  Not even the original excavators saw the mosaics in their ancient context because the roofs of the house were gone as were the walls that supported the roofs and created windows, doors, and a courtyard that admitted light into the house.  Excavation photographs present the mosaics in place, but the lighting conditions were those of the 1930s.  The ancient occupants saw light enter over walls, through windows, and between columns as it moved across pavements during the course of the day and the arc of the year.  Neither excavation photographs nor museum environments recreate the ancient context.

Computer science addresses the problem of the lost architectural and lighting contexts through a 3D model created by Ethan Gruber that recreates the house and inserts the mosaics into the spaces that originally contained them.  A programming script calibrates the sunlight to the latitude and longitude of Seleucia Pieria and is set to the year 230 thus enabling an accurate lighting simulation for the house and its mosaics.  The computer model presents a graphic rendering of the hypotheses underpinning the architectural reconstruction.  Lighting simulations present the lighting conditions at the summer and winter solstices of the year 230.  Time-lapse videos allow the viewer to observe and study the movement of light throughout the house on those days.  Finally, the model places the viewer within the ancient spaces, thereby reconstructing and recontextualizing view corridors within the house and from the house to the natural environment.

9 October 2014 - 6:00pm
Hartford Alumni Reception

Hartford Alumni Reception

9 October 2014 - 6:00pm
06:00 PM
Event Sponsor: 
Type of Event: 
Event Venue: 
Contact Person: 
Nicki Lazaros
508-767-7205
cn.lazaros@assumption.edu

Hartford Golf Club

View event invitation

19 October 2014 - 5:00pm
AC Jazz Ensemble

AC Jazz Ensemble

19 October 2014 - 5:00pm
Type of Event: 

Kennedy Memorial Hall - Room 112

23 October 2014 - 7:00pm to 8:30pm
Ecumenical Institute Lecture: “Why Nicaea Matters”

Ecumenical Institute Lecture: “Why Nicaea Matters”

23 October 2014 - 7:00pm to 8:30pm
Type of Event: 
Event Venue: 
Khaled Anatolios, Professor of Historical Theology at the Boston College School of Theology and Ministry, will deliver the annual Bishop Bernard J. Flanagan Lecture as part of the 2014-2015 Ecumenical Institute Lecture Series. The topic of this year’s lecture is “Why Nicaea Matters.”
 
All lectures in the series are free and open to the public
Contact Person: 
Marc A. LePain
508-767-7127
malepain@assumption.edu
General Admission Fee: 
Free

La Maison

Khaled Anatolios, Professor of Historical Theology at the Boston College School of Theology and Ministry, will deliver the annual Bishop Bernard J. Flanagan Lecture as part of the 2014-2015 Ecumenical Institute Lecture Series. The topic of this year’s lecture is “Why Nicaea Matters.”
 
All lectures in the series are free and open to the public
27 October 2014 - 7:30pm
Civil War Era Music

Civil War Era Music

27 October 2014 - 7:30pm
7:30 PM
Type of Event: 

This concert is a concert/lecture performance of music from the Civil War era of the United States played by an ensemble comprised of a Brass Quintet, Percussion, Piano and Vocalist. The pianist, Allan Mueller, has researched and arranged all the music for this performance. As well as the performance of these pieces, there will be a description of each piece focusing on its historical relevancy.     The ensemble will also feature two musicians with direct connection to Assumption College. The vocalist will be tenor Ray Bawens, '82 and Bruce Hopkins, the Band Director of the Assumption College Band.


Chapel of the Holy Spirit

This concert is a concert/lecture performance of music from the Civil War era of the United States played by an ensemble comprised of a Brass Quintet, Percussion, Piano and Vocalist. The pianist, Allan Mueller, has researched and arranged all the music for this performance. As well as the performance of these pieces, there will be a description of each piece focusing on its historical relevancy.     The ensemble will also feature two musicians with direct connection to Assumption College. The vocalist will be tenor Ray Bawens, '82 and Bruce Hopkins, the Band Director of the Assumption College Band.

November 2014
1 November 2014 - 7:00pm
Gamelan Galak Tika

Gamelan Galak Tika

1 November 2014 - 7:00pm
7:00 PM
Type of Event: 
Event Venue: 

Gamelan Galak Tika will perform a combination of traditional and modern repertoire for gamelan gong kebyar written by both American and Balinese composers. Galak Tika will devote part of the performance to breaking down and analyzing a section of music to help audience members hear the varied musical layers across the ensemble. There will also be time for students to learn a short segment of music and try out the instruments.


Hagan Hall

Gamelan Galak Tika will perform a combination of traditional and modern repertoire for gamelan gong kebyar written by both American and Balinese composers. Galak Tika will devote part of the performance to breaking down and analyzing a section of music to help audience members hear the varied musical layers across the ensemble. There will also be time for students to learn a short segment of music and try out the instruments.

9 November 2014 - 2:00pm
Voice recital by Julianne Gearhart, Soprano

Voice recital by Julianne Gearhart, Soprano

9 November 2014 - 2:00pm
2:00 PM
Type of Event: 

Reception to follow in the Tinsley Community Room.

Click Here to Read Julianne's Biography

Click Here to Visit Julianne's Website


Chapel of the Holy Spirit

Reception to follow in the Tinsley Community Room.

Click Here to Read Julianne's Biography

Click Here to Visit Julianne's Website

Julianne's Webiste
16 November 2014 - 1:30pm
NY City Alumni reception and Aladdin show

NY City Alumni reception and Aladdin show

16 November 2014 - 1:30pm
01:30 PM
Event Sponsor: 
Event Venue: 
Contact Person: 
Nicki Lazaros
508-767-7205
cn.lazaros@assumption.edu

New Amsterdam Theater

View NYC / Aladdin flyer

20 November 2014 - 3:00pm
String Camerata

String Camerata

20 November 2014 - 3:00pm
Type of Event: 

Chapel of the Holy Spirit

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