Summer Semester Courses

Summer Semester at Assumption: Small Classes, Reduced Cost
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Assumption's online and summer day courses provide students the opportunity to complete a semester-long course in six weeks with smaller class sizes at a reduced cost per course. Whether a student seeks to accelerate his/ her degree program, catch up, or simply focus on a particular course, this is an opportunity worth exploring.

The courses offered during the summer are the same versions as their fall or spring semester counterparts, taught by the same professors, and provide the same level of intellectual rigor. As such, no special permission is needed for Assumption students to “count” these courses as part of their curriculum. The only real difference is the summer classes cost less than the fall and spring versions.

SESSION I: May 16 - June 24, 2016
   
COURSE INSTRUCTOR SCHEDULE
PRINCIPLES OF ACCOUNTING I  Foley Online
INTRO TO THE CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEM Kaufman M/F 9 to Noon
INTRO TO COMPUTER SCIENCE Katcher T/T 9 to Noon
APPROACHES TO READING & INTERPRETATION  Shields Online
WEST AND THE WORLD I  Christensen Online
INTRO TO HUMAN SERVICES & REHAB STUDIES  Caron Online
ELEMENTARY FUNCTIONS Katcher M/W 9 to Noon
GLOBAL POP  Clemente Online
GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY  Gordon Online
PSYCH OF DEVELOPMENT: INFANCY & CHILDHOOD  Kalpidou Online
PSYCHOLOGY OF LEARNING Lionello-Denolf M/W 9 to Noon
MORAL THEOLOGY Klofft T/Th 9 to Noon
     
SESSION II: June 27 - August 5, 2016
   
COURSE INSTRUCTOR SCHEDULE
CHILDREN'S LITERATURE  Beyers Online
WEST AND THE WORLD II  Christensen Online
INTRO TO HUMAN SERVICES & REHAB STUDIES  Tyner Online
INTRODUCTION TO LATIN AMERICAN STUDIES  Loustaunau Online
CALCULUS I Alfano M/T/W/Th 9:30 - 11AM
STRATEGIC LEADERSHIP  Pastille Online
GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY  Kuersten-Hogan Online
ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY  Volungis Online
CATHOLICISM TODAY Klofft T/Th 9 to Noon

Summer I (May 16 - June 24, 2016)

ACC 125 PRINCIPLES OF ACCOUNTING I (ONLINE)
An introduction to accounting concepts for financial reporting. Accounting theories and principles relative to asset valuation, liability reporting, and income determination will be examined. The uses and limitations of external financial reports will be emphasized.
INSTRUCTOR: Joe Foley

CRM 130 INTRODUCTION TO THE CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEM
Mondays and Wednesdays, 9 a.m. to 12 noon
This survey level course introduces students to the purpose, structure, and function of the criminal justice system, which represents the government’s official response to crime. Students will learn about the role of the various aspects of the criminal justice system (i.e., law enforcement, courts, and corrections) in responding to and controlling crime. A significant focus of the class will be on critical analysis of criminal justice policy and programs, such as mandatory minimum sentences for drug offenses, New York City’s stop and frisk campaign, sex offender residency restrictions, mandatory arrest laws for domestic violence, day reporting centers for probationers and parolees, and victimless prosecution of domestic violence cases. The course will also force students to consider the challenges facing the criminal justice system, including an aging prison population, the impact of incarceration on families and communities, the pressure to efficiently process high caseloads, and protecting personal liberties while keeping citizens safe.
INSTRUCTOR: Angela Kaufman

CSC 113 INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER SCIENCE
Tuesdays and Thursdays, 9 a.m. to 12 noon
This course presents an overview of computers and their applications. Students are exposed to a variety of platforms (e.g. MAC, PC, etc.). Topics include popular applications as well as hardware, software, the Internet, social implications and multimedia. Each semester the department will offer sections of CSC113 with a specific emphasis: business applications, ethical implications, computer programming, and general computer science.
INSTRUCTOR: William Katcher

ENG 220 APPROACHES TO READING AND INTERPRETATION (ONLINE)
This writing emphasis course considers fundamental issues of textual interpretation, primarily but not exclusively in the print media. Representative readings, limited in number, will be chosen from a variety of genres and historical periods. In addition to adopting a critical vocabulary that will assist close reading of texts, the course also introduces the student to various interpretive strategies: formalist, historical, reader-response, structuralist, and deconstructionist, among others.
INSTRUCTOR: Paul Shields

HIS 114 WEST AND THE WORLD I (ONLINE)
This course explores important episodes and trends in the history of Europe, Asia, Africa, and the Americas from ancient times until the late eighteenth century. Participants study the origins and worldwide expansion of Christianity, the dramatic transformation of Western European societies during the Renaissance and after, and the collision and convergence of European, American, Asian, and African civilizations across the centuries. The course emphasizes the written analysis of primary and secondary documents.
INSTRUCTOR: Mark Christensen

HRS 119 INTRODUCTION TO HUMAN SERVICES AND REHABILITATION STUDIES (ONLINE)
This course is an introduction to the theory and practice of Human Services and Rehabilitation Studies. The information presented in this course is intended for students in ALL majors so that they may become politically, culturally, socially and humanly aware of the issues many individuals with special needs face. This course employs a social justice framework and provides students with information about the history, legislative underpinnings, mission, purpose, and services provided to individuals across the lifespan by human and rehabilitation service organizations. This course examines the major models and theories of helping that can be used to support/help individuals experiencing the myriad of developmental, environmental, economic, political, social, vocational, behavioral, physical, psychological and learning issues. Current issues and trends in human service provision are covered with specific attention to disability and other types of diversity. Ethics and ethical decision making in the human services is covered in this course. A service-learning component may be integrated in this course to provide students with the opportunity to observe and volunteer in a human and/or rehabilitation service setting.
INSTRUCTOR: Robert Caron

MAT 114 ELEMENTARY FUNCTIONS
Mondays and Wednesdays, 9 a.m. to 12 noon
A survey of those topics in algebra, trigonometry, and analytic geometry which provide the background for the study of calculus. Topics to be covered include exponential and logarithmic functions, complex numbers and polynomial functions, trigonometry, plane analytic geometry, and systems of linear equations and inequalities. The department also offers sections of MAT 114 with a specific emphasis on business or science applications; the content coverage may include topics in financial mathematics and matrices.
INSTRUCTOR: William Katcher

MUS 126 GLOBAL POP (ONLINE)
A category of ethnomusicology, Global Pop explores musical traditions from a variety of nations with an emphasis on the popular music industry in each. This course examines the forces that enable the movement of music and musicians around the world and that give global music its persuasive power. Topics include music as expressive culture, music production, ethnicity and identity in pop music, music as symbol, cross-cultural collaborations in popular music, and music as a force that transcends sociological, political and national boundaries.
INSTRUCTOR: Peter Clemente

PSY 101 GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY (ONLINE)
In this introduction to psychology, students learn the language, methods, theoretical perspectives, and research of the discipline. This course introduces students to a range of topics within psychology, such as the biological and social bases of behavior, as well as basic principles of perception, learning, and motivation.
INSTRUCTOR: Leamarie Gordon

PSY 190 PSYCHOLOGY OF DEVELOPMENT: INFANCY AND CHILDHOOD (ONLINE)
This course examines human growth and development during infancy and childhood. Emphasis is placed on the relationship between theory, research, and the application of knowledge in child development. Different theoretical perspectives (psychoanalytic, behavioral, cognitive developmental); current research on selected topics (e.g., day care, cross-cultural differences in child rearing); and ways to encourage optimal growth in children at home, with friends, and at school are reviewed.
INSTRUCTOR: Maria Kalpidou

PSY 353 PSYCHOLOGY OF LEARNING
Mondays and Wednesdays, 9 a.m. to 12 noon
The purpose of this course is to provide students with a grounding in important principles of learning, such as conditioning, extinction, generalization, and discrimination. The behavioral approach of B.F. Skinner is predominant throughout the course, although the concepts of important learning theorists such as Thorndike, Tolman, and Hull are also presented. In addition, the philosophical underpinnings of a learning-based model of human behavior and the complex questions of freedom and determinism raised by modern behaviorism are addressed in the course.
INSTRUCTOR: Karen Lionello-Denolf

THE 202 MORAL THEOLOGY
Tuesdays and Thursdays 9 a.m. to 12 noon
No one can live a genuinely human life without asking the question “How should I live and what kind of life will make me happy?” This course introduces students to the unique way in which theology goes about answering the question of human flourishing. Moral theology is not so much preoccupied with drafting ethical and legal codes, but rather with shedding light on those actions that respond to the deepest aspirations of the human heart. Beginning with the premise that human beings need to be related to God if they are to be truly happy, this class invites students to think about what it would mean to live a morally serious human life.
INSTRUCTOR: Christopher Klofft

Summer II (June 27 - August 5, 2016)

ENG 263 CHILDREN'S LITERATURE (ONLINE)
This course provides a general overview of the field of children’s literature. Students read representative classic and contemporary works of children’s literature from a variety of genres, including fairy and folk tales, modern fantasy, realism, and nonfiction. They evaluate text and illustration, as well as address current issues in the field. Further, through disciplined examination of the history and tradition of children’s literature, students develop an appreciation for children’s books and those who create them. Prerequisites: ENG 130 and any Introduction to Literature.
INSTRUCTOR: Chris Beyers

HIS 115 WEST AND THE WORLD II (ONLINE)
This course explores the expansion of political participation in Europe from the Atlantic Revolutions of the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries to the present. Students study the commercial revolution in Europe and North America as well as other areas of the world. They examine the experiences of societies in Asia, Africa, and the Americas as global capitalism emerged and European and North American colonial empires expanded. The course also treats the two World Wars of the twentieth century and the emergence of powerful challenges to liberal democracy worldwide, including communism, fascism, and anti-colonial nationalism. It concludes with the study of particular episodes and trends in world history after 1945. At the instructor’s discretion, these might include the Cold War, emergence of the United States as a superpower, the rise of mass consumer societies, decolonization, changes in gender and family relations, 9/11, the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, and other themes. The course emphasizes the written analysis of primary and secondary documents.
INSTRUCTOR: Mark Christensen

HRS 119 INTRODUCTION TO HUMAN SERVICES AND REHABILITATION STUDIES (ONLINE)
This course is an introduction to the theory and practice of Human Services and Rehabilitation Studies. The information presented in this course is intended for students in ALL majors so that they may become politically, culturally, socially and humanly aware of the issues many individuals with special needs face. This course employs a social justice framework and provides students with information about the history, legislative underpinnings, mission, purpose, and services provided to individuals across the lifespan by human and rehabilitation service organizations. This course examines the major models and theories of helping that can be used to support/help individuals experiencing the myriad of developmental, environmental, economic, political, social, vocational, behavioral, physical, psychological and learning issues. Current issues and trends in human service provision are covered with specific attention to disability and other types of diversity. Ethics and ethical decision making in the human services is covered in this course. A service-learning component may be integrated in this course to provide students with the opportunity to observe and volunteer in a human and/or rehabilitation service setting.
INSTRUCTOR: Scott Tyner

LAS 200 INTRODUCTION TO LATIN AMERICAN STUDIES (ONLINE)
A comprehensive introduction to Latin America and the Caribbean, this course provides a foundation for understanding the cultures and societies of the region. The course focuses on the diversity of cultures, indigenous peoples and those who came later, past and present interactions between this region and the rest of the world, and literature, art, and music.
INSTRUCTOR: Esteban Loustaunau

MAT 117 CALCULUS I
Mondays and Wednesdays, 9:30 to 11 a.m.; Tuesdays and Thursdays, 9:30 to 11 a.m.
An introductory course in differential calculus. Topics to be covered include limits and continuity, the derivative and applications, and an introduction to integration. The department also offers sections of MAT117 with a specific emphasis on business applications.
INSTRUCTOR: Joe Alfano

MGT 305 STRATEGIC LEADERSHIP (ONLINE)
Leadership is the process of transforming organizations from what they are to what the leader would have them become. This course builds upon the basic knowledge of leadership theory and practice provided in an introduction to management and organizational behavior course, and prepares the student for a capstone course in business strategy by (1) expanding the scope and depth of the student’s knowledge of leadership theories in the context of creating strategy in a globalized world, (2) building the student’s capacity to apply leadership theory to situations arising from the economic, social and environmental conditions that are transforming our world in the early 21st century, and (3) developing the student’s self-knowledge of his or her actual as well as desired leadership style.
INSTRUCTOR: Catherine Pastille

PSY 101 GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY (ONLINE)
In this introduction to psychology, students learn the language, methods, theoretical perspectives, and research of the discipline. This course introduces students to a range of topics within psychology, such as the biological and social bases of behavior, as well as basic principles of perception, learning, and motivation.
INSTRUCTOR: Regina Kuersten-Hogan

PSY 116 ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY (ONLINE)
This course provides students with a detailed description and analysis of the forms of behavior seen as abnormal in our contemporary culture. Research relevant to and theoretical perspectives on these disorders are presented. Throughout the course students are asked to consider the implications of being labeled abnormal and to apply their knowledge to individual cases.
INSTRUCTOR: Adam Volungis

THE 204 CATHOLICISM TODAY
Tuesdays and Thursdays, 9 a.m. to 12 noon
Catholics do not live their lives within a Catholic bubble, a hermetically sealed world in which everyone and everything is shaped by the teachings of Catholicism. Christ himself said this would not be the case, informing his disciples that in this world they would have to render to Caesar the things that are Caesar’s and to God that things that are God’s. As a result, the Catholic Church has always had to find some way of engaging the world in which it currently finds itself. This course introduces students to Catholicism’s ongoing engagement with the world today, paying particular attention to both the main currents in contemporary thought and the representative social movements that shape the modern world.
INSTRUCTOR: Christopher Klofft